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 [F] Mystery Net Community  / Mystery Greats  /

Nero Wolfe
 
We're curious if any other mystery buffs are addicted to Rex Stout. Is Wolfe truly an olympus of detection - compared with say, Poirot or Maigret?

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Suzanne LeBarron - 03:48pm Mar 11, 1999 PST(#61 of 128)

I'm almost embarrassed to send this because my reference will be a mystery in itself; but for Wolfe fans there is something very funny buried in a book (here's the embarrassing part) whose author and title I can't remember. The book ...Magician... assumes that magic rather than science dominates society. It is a mystery set in a very different contemporary England. The different Wolfe and Archie make the entire book worth reading. Does anyone know what the book is? If not, I'll try to locate it again and give the author/title.


Mark J Tilford - 09:22pm Mar 11, 1999 PST(#62 of 128)
A Freak among freaks

Could that be _Took Many Magicians_ by Garret? (Or at least I think it's by Garret... I haven't read it myself, but I heard it had a good NW parody in it, in addition to the title.)

---
mjt


Suzanne LeBarron - 05:50pm Mar 12, 1999 PST(#63 of 128)

Yes, I found it in the library today classed as SF. Its TOO MANY MAGICIANS by Randall Garrett. While the alternative history rather makes it SF, only mystery readers,especially NW fans can really appreciate the characters.


Alan Krischer - 09:13am Mar 15, 1999 PST(#64 of 128)

It is a pleasure to have discovered this message board, as I have been a huge fan of Stout's work for many, many years. Addicted is probably the right word; I love immersing myself in the atmosphere of the old brownstown and stepping back into Wolfe's world.

The lead on this discussion groups asks if Wolfe is an olympus of detection like Maigret or Poirot: an appropriate turn of phrase, given the origins of Wolfe's name. I certainly believe so - I have enjoyed re-reading Stout more than any other author, and certainly enjoy his "artistry" more than the exercise of those little grey cells.


Suzanne LeBarron - 04:06pm Apr 20, 1999 PST(#65 of 128)

I've just read The Silent Speaker, a new one for me as I've been gradually buying the bantam books reprints because so many old titles are missing from libraries. While I often smile when reading Archie in this case, in a scene toward the end I laughed out loud until tears came. If you haven't read it or if its been a while, give yourself a treat.


T McManus - 09:06pm May 17, 1999 PST(#66 of 128)

For Wolfe fans and cooks, try finding the Nero Wolfe cookbook. Recipes from all his books and includes the book and paragraph that the meal was mentioned. Great fun. Printed in 1973, viking press.


MARGOT SHAFFER - 06:33am May 19, 1999 PST(#67 of 128)

Does anyone know whether the Nero Wolfe mysteries that were on TV years ago are available for VCRs?


T MCMANUS - 06:06pm May 20, 1999 PST(#68 of 128)

I was just reading the older messages and see that the cookbook was discussed quite awhile ago. i used to belong to a cooking club and we used the book for the theme-everyone had to make a recipe from the book. With some (actually many) adjustments to the recipes-hard to find all the ingredients- it was fun. Someone asked about other authors with food as part of the story. Lawrence Sander's McNally books are filled with them and, in fact, his Archie McNally reminds me of Wolfes Archie and the relationship between McNally and his father is not unlike Archie and Wolfe.

Who played the part of Archie on the TV show? I only saw it once and hadnt as yet read any of the books so cant compare.

I have since named a cat Nero. Everyone thinks hes named after the emperor, but, of course, it's our favorite detective. The cat has certainly grown into the part, both physically and in attitude.


Bill Kochuk - 08:17pm May 26, 1999 PST(#69 of 128)

Anyone have a summary list of the Wolfe novels with a synopsis of each story? I'd like one to see what I've read and what I have yet to read.


Jim Parhamovich - 06:57am May 28, 1999 PST(#70 of 128)

Unless I'm mistaken, I believe Lee Horsley(sp) played Archie on the short lived tv series.

With all the stuff happening in Yugoslavia, I've started reading the Black Mountain again. This makes for interesting reading.


Pearl Z - 03:35pm May 29, 1999 PST(#71 of 128)

I started reading Nero Wolfe right after seeing the series being run on TVLand again. I had to hunt through all the 2nd hand book stores to find them but once you get started on them they are addicting. And yes, Lee Horsley played Archie on the series.


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 [F] Mystery Net Community  / Mystery Greats  / Nero Wolfe

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