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 [F] Mystery Net Community  / Mystery Books & Authors  / Genres and Themes  / Locations  /

Murder in Cold Climates
 
Cold climates are the new hot spots for crime, murder and other mayhem. The mysteries range from Martin Cruz Smith's Polar Star series set in Russia to Peter Hoeg's Greenland-based Smilla's Sense of Snow.

Got an opinion on mysteries set in icy atmospheres? Post it here.


Previous MessagesEarliest MessagesOutlineRecent Messages (6 previous messages)
Fran Hinkel - 08:10am Jun 15, 1999 PST(#7 of 15)
You can check out anytime you like...but you can never leave!

Hi Hugh

I've just picked up a copy of Smilla's Sense of Snow - just need to find time to read it now!


Hugh Drummond - 01:28am Jun 16, 1999 PST(#8 of 15)
" I have a criminal mind... I see bad in everyone," (Mr. J.G. Reeder)

Which could be difficult. It's a big book. And don't throw it out of the window in disgust. You never know who you might hit (my copy was a present from an uncle. Which is why it isn't in the OXFAM second-hand bookshop in town).

HUD


Katarina Rundgren - 12:57am Jul 13, 1999 PST(#9 of 15)
A stranger is a friend you have yet to meet

Ok, I'll cave in...

About "Miss Smilla"... I found the story good and interesting, but I just couldn't relate to Smilla, she was just too cold for me. I can't relate to people the way that she did, I could never do any of the things that she did, I don't consider myself very vain but I couldn't be so indifferent to some of the injuries that she got like she was.

It's been quite a while since I read it now, but as I remember it I couldn't put it down until it was finished, despite not liking Smilla... so I guess I'd have to say it was a good book... ;-)


Rik Shepherd. - 11:04am Jul 13, 1999 PST(#10 of 15)
Never hire a ferret to do a weasel's job

I quite liked it when I read it, but I was stuck in a small hotel room in a not very beautiful bit of the South Wales coast, being rather unhappy, so the book sort of fitted with my mood...


Hugh Drummond - 08:52am Aug 31, 1999 PST(#11 of 15)
" I have a criminal mind... I see bad in everyone," (Mr. J.G. Reeder)

Oh, I don't kno, a good walk in the rain is the best thing for depression.

For a Greenlander, Smilla seems extremely stupid, Any fool knows that the last thing you do before diving into freezing water is strip. Especially if you're in a harbour, and the chances of retreiving your clothes are Nil (I mean, did the woman WANT to spend the night in the jug for indecency?)

I didn't put it down. Having a tidy mind I like to finish a book before I start a new one, and I had a very good Horler waiting for me.

Katarina, Would you say that your not being able to relate to Smilla was due to her being written by a man. A man can get away with a female character, but I have yet to find a male author who can write well from a female POV.

HUD


Katarina Rundgren - 03:08pm Sep 9, 1999 PST(#12 of 15)
A stranger is a friend you have yet to meet

Hugh,

I don't know if I find Smilla hard to relate to because she was written by a man, there are women created by female authours that I have equally hard to relate too, but usually for the opposite reason I guess. Like Nancy Taylor Rosenberg's female characters that are usually so "helpless" most of the time and always needs a man to the rescue in one way or another. But then that's not uncommon for any character in a thriller/mystery, that they act in a way that's not completely logical to me and most of the time I guess that is because the story would end too quickly if they did act logically and was able to think straight all the time.

Also I don't really subscribe to the idea that men and women are almost different species, do we really use such different thought processes? I don't know. What do you think? How do you feel about male characters created by female authours? Like Hercule Poirot or Lord Peter Whimsey or....


Hugh Drummond - 06:44am Sep 26, 1999 PST(#13 of 15)
" I have a criminal mind... I see bad in everyone," (Mr. J.G. Reeder)

That's not my idea. My idea is that it is less easy for a man to get inside the head of a female character. Often (e.g. Ian Fleming 'The Spy Who Loved Me) because the man believes that men and women have utterly different thought processes.

Edgar Wallace and Sydney Horler in the 1920s wrote some very good, and reasonably realistic, shopgirl characters. I was talking about writing in the first person not about simply writing characters of the opposite sex.

Now, I needs must go and have a cup of tea or something with a friend. Toodle-pip. Nice Valid point.

HUD


Rik Shepherd. - 09:03am Nov 20, 1999 PST(#14 of 15)
Never hire a ferret to do a weasel's job

Crime in a Cold Climate, editted by David Skene-Melvin, bills itself as An Anthology of Classic Canadian Crime, and is a collection of short stories and poems by late 19th and early twentieth century Canadians.

To my shame, the only one I'd ever heard before was Service's The Shooting of Dan McGrew


Hugh Drummond - 05:56am Dec 2, 1999 PST(#15 of 15)
" I have a criminal mind... I see bad in everyone," (Mr. J.G. Reeder)

And how many of you out there had heard of Service? I have, but I am me, and 'Sapper' quotes him.

HUD

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