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 [F] Mystery Net Community  / Mystery Greats  / Agatha Christie  / Assorted Tidbits and Trivia  /

Guessing the Culprit!
 
Posted by: Nick Crosby guest user 1:13 am Dec 30, 2000. I have read about 30 Agatha Christie novels and I have solved about 20 of them. The first ones I read, I did not catch on as well, but then I started to catch on and now I solve most Agatha Christies that I read. Is this good or do the answers seem clear to you like they do to me. Please respond!

Previous MessagesEarliest MessagesOutlineRecent Messages (70 previous messages)
Andrew McLennan - 03:11pm Mar 7, 2004 PST(#71 of 81)

Hi John, nice to meet you. That's a good point you make about the killer's thoughts. I certainly didn't catch on to it. I have heard and read much about Christie's deft "sleight of hand" when giving clues and that is a perfect example.

I have lived in Sydney all my life and most of that has been spent in Western Sydney, in the Campbelltown area. Not the most picturesque of Sydney's parts but home is home... :-)


C. MacDonald - 09:49am May 15, 2005 PST(#72 of 81)

I don't think Ms. Christie gives clues all the time to the culprit. The majority of the time she does however. Read 45 novels and collections. The best is the short story Witness for the Prosecution, a work of genius, and the worst is Passenger to Frankfurt a book I would have never read if it wasn't Christie's. My father was born in Belgian of the French variety but Ms. Christie obviously never knew that there is a Belgian French dialect which Poirot never reverts to. She probably made him Belgian because the British and French despised each other and Poirot had to be more acceptable to readers. Anyway, rock on!!


Missy Sweesy - 08:19pm May 15, 2005 PST(#73 of 81)
Life has a way of finding you, no matter how artistic a sneak you are.---Keeper proverb---Thief: The Dark Project.

Some of the problem with Christie not giving clues are all those telegrams, wires, etc. We never get to see what they are until the solution. With that info, I'm sure more of us could solve the mysteries.

I didn't know there was a Belgian dialect. Thanks for that tidbit. This brings to mind one of the movies (Ustinov's Poirot)---someone says "You're a Frenchie"...he states, "No, I am a Belgie". That one always makes me smile.


Mark B - 09:29am May 18, 2005 PST(#74 of 81)

Similarly, in the first movie of Death on the Nile, Bette Davis' character refers to Poirot as a "perfectly foul French upstart" to which Poirot/Ustinov replys, "Belgian upstart, madame."


Missy Sweesy - 10:54pm May 19, 2005 PST(#75 of 81)
Life has a way of finding you, no matter how artistic a sneak you are.---Keeper proverb---Thief: The Dark Project.

:-) for that one too Mark!


Rik Shepherd - 01:40pm May 23, 2005 PST(#76 of 81)
Another belief of mine: that everyone else my age is an adult, whereas I am merely in disguise (Margaret Atwood)

Didn't she make Poirot Belgian because she met some Belgian refugees during the First World War ?


Eeva - 09:23pm May 23, 2005 PST(#77 of 81)

I have wondered about Poirot's name...did she make some mistake with it so that it's not truly Belgian? That's because mrs Ariadne Olivier seems to be AC and she writes about a finnish detective who has a danish name. Or did AC make a mistake with that one?


Mark B - 04:47am May 24, 2005 PST(#78 of 81)

I believe that she did encounter Belgian refugees in her neighborhood during WWI and that she modeled Poirot after that fact.

Regarding the name, I have read in various places of very similar sounding names of other fictional detectives prominent at that time. It seems that since Agatha and her sister were fond of detective fiction, that they would be aware of these other characters and that Agatha might select something similar since it was French/Belgian sounding.


michele duff - 02:30pm Oct 1, 2007 PST(#79 of 81)

Who are know as Christie's Crime Fighters


Missy Sweesy - 11:13am Oct 2, 2007 PST(#80 of 81)
Life has a way of finding you, no matter how artistic a sneak you are.---Keeper proverb---Thief: The Dark Project.

Whoever her detective is in whatever book you happen to be reading. She's got several, and we've got discussion areas for all of them.

I suppose since it's back to school time, I should state that we do not do homework for anyone, but we will help to explain some complex idea/plot Agatha Christie wrote about, etc.


Lasso - 07:22pm May 4, 2010 PST(#81 of 81)
If growing up is the process of creating ideas and dreams about what life should be, then maturity is letting go again.

Hmm, does anyone feel slightly cheated with some of Christie's later work? I feel like often there is hidden information which makes it difficult for the reader to come to the conclusion. In the earlier work you feel the solution lies in a spoken sentence that you you read and didn't pick up on, but a lot of later work pulls in previously unknown third party information.

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 [F] Mystery Net Community  / Mystery Greats  / Agatha Christie  / Assorted Tidbits and Trivia  / Guessing the Culprit!

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