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 [F] Mystery Net Community  / Mystery Greats  / Agatha Christie  / Books & Plays  /

Miss Marple Mysteries
 
A keen-witted spinster who lives in the sleepy village of St. Mary's Mead, Miss Jane Marple has appeared in twelve books and twenty short stories. She is an icon of 20th century mystery fiction and has fans worldwide.

Discuss the Miss Marple books here!

To discuss the Miss Marple short stories, click here.


Previous MessagesEarliest MessagesOutlineRecent Messages (212 previous messages)
Missy Sweesy - 08:31pm Mar 26, 2004 PST(#213 of 222)
Life has a way of finding you, no matter how artistic a sneak you are.---Keeper proverb---Thief: The Dark Project.

Now there's something interesting...

Andrew, you mention Inspector Neele. Neele was the last name of Archie's mistress, wasn't it??

...


Andrew McLennan - 05:55pm Mar 28, 2004 PST(#214 of 222)

Mark, I agree with everything you say. At Bertram's Hotel (while not my favourite) is full of interesting scenes and has a lot to offer readers in ways other Christie's don't. For me, The Mirror Crack'd was the best of all the Marples and Poirot's in the 60's. I loved it. I felt the same as you Mark about the Poirot's: The Clocks was a disappointing book. I was fully immersed for the first half or so but it really lost it's way towards the end and left me feeling unsatisfied. Third Girl is one of my least favourites. There wasn't a lot about it I liked. Christie obviously wasn't impressed by the swinging 60's and Poirot just seemed like a different, and far less memorable, character. Hallowe'en Party, as Mark said, is somewhat stronger and holds your attention, but never really hits any great heights. Mrs Oliver is in good form though.

John, I will have to check up on specific lines that will explain what I mean. I can tell you that once you know the killer, go back and reread some of his/her early scenes...I just recall there being some clever nuances in thought/talk used by Christie. You may not agree with me, but that was what I jumped on straight away and it turned out to be right. I will get a couple of examples for you to explain better.

Missy, I believe you're right, but will have to check. Under the circumstances you would think Insp. Neele would be somewhat shady or dispicable in APoR, but he's anything but! Maybe Christie just chose the name sub-conciously...


Mark B - 10:46am Mar 29, 2004 PST(#215 of 222)

For some reason, every time I read Third Girl, I hope that Mrs. Oliver doesn't get "coshed". I guess I'm just old fashioned and don't think you should whack old ladies on the head!


Missy Sweesy - 07:51pm Mar 29, 2004 PST(#216 of 222)
Life has a way of finding you, no matter how artistic a sneak you are.---Keeper proverb---Thief: The Dark Project.

LOL Mark :-)


DeeGee - 08:46am Mar 30, 2004 PST(#217 of 222)
A birth certificate shows you were born. A death certificate shows you have died. A photo album shows you have lived.

LOL! I think Ms Oliver would object to been called an old lady.

I for some reason never see her as old as Miss Marple.. I don't know why.. but I see her as a rather scatty and eccentric forty five year old.

I wonder if this is what AC thought? can anyone remember her actually mentioning AO age?


Mark B - 10:09am Mar 30, 2004 PST(#218 of 222)

You may be right on this--I don't think her age was ever mentioned. Somehow, I pictured her as about Agatha's age, which would be 60 in 1950 and in her late 70s by the time of Third Girl. Of course the aging of Christie's characters never did seem to follow the calendar the rest of us use!


DeeGee - 10:44am Mar 30, 2004 PST(#219 of 222)
A birth certificate shows you were born. A death certificate shows you have died. A photo album shows you have lived.

Ah! thats because it's a female calender.


Andrew McLennan - 06:09pm Apr 14, 2004 PST(#220 of 222)

John, I had a flick through APoR and without rereading it I can't quite find what I was referring to. Typical! Makes me sound quite a dolt. I remember there certainly wasn't any big material clue given...I'm not sure...it may have been no more than just a feeling I got, some psychological instinct, but the killer made him/her-self known to me very early on. Let me know if you have a similar experience.


John Spender - 01:54am Apr 17, 2004 PST(#221 of 222)

Thanks for that Andrew

SPOILER

I think I found it. In the chapter fo the book where the reader first meets Lance Fortescue (the killer) he looks lovingly at his wife, Pat, and thinks to himself "It is all worth it for her" or words to that effect. Ambiguous, admittedly, but could give some readers a hint


Andrew McLennan - 10:43pm Apr 19, 2004 PST(#222 of 222)

John.....Bingo! That, I now recall, was a line I was suspicious about when reading the book. It's funny...in most of her books there are often several such ambiguous lines that turn out totally innocent...but there's usually one or two not so innocent examples also. As luck would have it, this one stuck in my head for the rest of the book and I was not surprised when the killer was finally revealed. However...after reading some 65 AC books I can only say I have confidently solved around 15 or so.....Mrs Christie leads comfortably!

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