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 [F] Mystery Net Community  / Writing Mysteries  / The Research  /

Researching experts
 
What methods of research seem to work best when researching things like police work, forensics, or medicine? Thanks for your input.

Fran Hinkel - 09:02am Aug 13, 2002 PST(#1 of 6)
You can check out anytime you like...but you can never leave!

Well, I don't write, myself. But perhaps if you contacted your local law enforcement agency, they may have Public Information Officers who can help you or point you in the right direction. I would think that a lot of forensic information, as well as medicine, would be searchable on the internet if you have something specific in mind. Good luck!


Mike Royye - 10:11pm Aug 24, 2002 PST(#2 of 6)

Hi everyone! I am writing a mystery set in the Renaissance period. I am well into the 1st draft, but I haven't done a lot of research. I figured I would do that in the 2nd draft. Would that work out? If not, what would you suggest?


KayakOhio - 05:16pm Sep 4, 2002 PST(#3 of 6)

Curious problem . . .

I am nearly 200 pages into writing a mystery and have found that some of the research is easy and the balance a bit more difficult. For example, I don't want my local law enforcement folks thinking that I am plotting to off someone, although I do plan to do so on paper!

How does one go about proving one's legitimacy as an unpublished writer?


Juanita Rose Violini - 11:02am Sep 5, 2002 PST(#4 of 6)
www.incrediblealmanac.com

Hi Mark - i would seriously suggest doing most if not all of your research before you write too much or you might spend a lot of time rewriting unnecessarily, especially if your cluetrail is tied to a fact that you later find out doesn't fit the time period. For sure some details can be left until later but it might be tricky to know which ones without actually doing all the research. As well, research can often suggest scenes or motives that add colour and authenticity to your work.


macgyvermagic - 03:58am Mar 21, 2003 PST(#5 of 6)

For example, I don't want my local law enforcement folks thinking that I am plotting to off someone, although I do plan to do so on paper!

How does one go about proving one's legitimacy as an unpublished writer?

I'd say show them a part of the manuscript if they don't believe you. Most people would be thrilled to help though....


Dennis Griffin - 07:59am Aug 27, 2005 PST(#6 of 6)

I used generic police procedures in my books initially, but when I began writing a trilogy featuring a male/female homicide detective team with the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Dept., I thought it would be best to learn the procedures specific to Metro. I called the department and was put in touch with the lieutenant in charge of the Homicide Unit. When we met I explained the premise of my book and that I was striving for realism and accuracy. He seemed to appreciate my efforts and was most helpful in explaining Metro's protocols and jargon.

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 [F] Mystery Net Community  / Writing Mysteries  / The Research  / Researching experts

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